5/09 ALEC Articles and News in Review

Today’s stories related to the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) and the Koch funded cabal ALEC fronts for.

Click on the headline of the article to view the entire story…

ALEC in Nevada spotlight

“For many years, the Nevada Legislature has paid $1,000 a year dues to the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), just as it does to groups like the National Conference of State Legislatures and the Council of State Governments.

“But in the case of ALEC, the lawmakers were actually making a contribution of taxpayer dollars to a right wing political group.”

ALEC Exposed in Nevada – Nevada State Report on ALEC Legislation and Members

ALEC is not OK

“MORE THAN 600 protesters, the majority of them union members, turned out in Oklahoma City on May 2 to against a task force summit meeting of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC).”

Bank of America Faces Backlash Over Decision to Drop Free-Market Advocate and Helping to Label Voter Integrity Proponents as “Racist”

The National Center for Public Policy Research continues to criticize corporations, banks, financial institutions and non-profits who drop membership in ALEC.  BoA is the latest to come under fire from this right wing think tank on that issue.

 

Charlotte, NC / Washington, D.C. – At today’s annual Bank of America shareholder meeting in Charlotte, N.C., an attorney with the National Center for Public Policy Research criticized Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan for caving to left-wing race bullies and dropping its membership the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), a venerable network of conservative state legislators.

 

Bank of America dumped ALEC after a concerted effort by Color of Change, Common Cause and the Occupy movement to defund ALEC by intimidating its corporate members.

 

NC renewable energy repeal advanced by committee despite losing vote

“Last week North Carolina’s Senate Finance Committee advanced a bill to repeal the state’s renewable energy standard in a controversial voice vote where the outcome was unclear.

“It turns out that if committee co-chair Bill Rabon (R-New Hanover) had actually counted the votes as Democrats requested, the measure would have lost. Rabon ignored calls for a show of hands.

“WRAL News interviewed the members of the committee who were present for the vote — 25 Republicans and 10 Democrats. All of the Democrats voted against the bill, and eight Republicans said they did as well. Two Republicans refused to say how they voted.

“That means the measure got 17 votes at most. It needed 18 to pass.”

Wendy Greuel and Eric Garcetti Stop Hesitating and Support Parent Trigger

Parent Trigger is a key legislative measure advanced by ALEC nationwide as part of their attacks upon public education.  Parent Trigger’s are used to turn public schools “around”…that is to turn them into charter schools run by private for-profit and non-profit companies and corporations.

Mayoral candidates in Los Angeles hesitated to endorse parent trigger, but just announced their support for the legislation.

“It took a while, but Los Angeles mayoral hopefuls Eric Garcetti and Wendy Greuel finally met with parents and students on Monday at Los Angeles Unified’s chronically failing 24th Street Elementary School, where the district’s first “Parent Trigger” took place.

“The Parent Trigger, which is viewed as a controversial yet unique education reform tool, allows parents to take over a chronically failing school through petition, which is what recently happened at 24th Street Elementary.

“While current L.A. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa quickly supported the takeover at 24th Street, Garcetti and Greuel — especially Garcetti — hesitated. That’s all over now.

 

Deal on taxes and spending in Kansas could be near

“Lawmakers return to Topeka on Wednesday after a monthlong break with a deal just out of grasp to cut income taxes and balance the budget.

“Even with deeply rooted differences over renewing a sales-tax hike, key lawmakers say a bargain could crystallize as early as this weekend.

“I have been very optimistic all along,” said Rep. Richard Carlson, a St. Marys Republican and one of the key budget negotiators. “We intend to find an amicable solution that benefits all the taxpayers in Kansas.”

“Still, the shape of a solution remained unclear Tuesday after leadership teams from the House and Senate exchanged ideas in Oklahoma City. They’d met there at a conservative American Legislative Exchange Council conference last week.

“House Speaker Ray Merrick said three or four tax plans remained in play but declined to provide details.

Rep. Ray Merrick (R-27), is quite active in ALEC and a staunch member who serves as a State Chairman,[18] was ALEC’s “Legislator of the Year” in 2010,[3]  is an Energy, Environment and Agriculture Task Force member[19] , sits on the ALEC Board of Directors [20] and attended 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[2].

OK gov. and legislators ponder next steps on state Medicaid program

“Some foes of the ACA, aka “Obamacare,” fear the Sooner State‘s leaders may be inclined to implement the president’s agenda indirectly. In a recent speech at the task force meeting for the American Legislative Exchange Council, Fallin reiterated her opposition to Obamacare Medicaid expansion, but said officials were working on a state reform that would involve waivers.” 

Raging Grannies Arrested After Fighting for Poor Kids

When elderly women get arrested for protesting, people pay attention.

That’s what happened on Monday in Durham, North Carolina.

More than 200 people from various organizations, including lawyers, students, preachers from across the state, physicians, leading historians, and a group of senior citizens known as the “Raging Grannies,” held a peaceful “pray-in” and “teach-in” at the statehouse to protest the Republican-controlled legislature’s agenda. The grannies even sung some anti-war and anti-poverty protest songs.

More than 30 people, including some of the Raging Grannies, were arrested during the protest.

Several of the bills that have gotten pushback from the Raging Grannies, and other groups, are similar to bills that have been introduced by Republicans in other Southern states, including Arkansas, South Carolina, and Louisiana.

Barber said many of the bills are pushed by the American Legislative Exchange Council, a private conservative group backed by major corporations that proposes model legislation on an array of issues such as more vouchers and charter schools.