5/14 – Today’s Review of ALEC/Koch Cabal Related Articles and Material

 

Today’s stories, articles and material related to ALEC and the Koch funded conservative cabal.

Click on headline link to read the full article(s)…

Are Vouchers Dead?

“When news broke Tuesday that the Louisiana Supreme Court struck down Louisiana’s voucher system, which uses public dollars to pay for low-income students to go to private schools, the fight over vouchers made its way back into the headlines. The Louisiana program, pushed hard and publicly by Republican Governor Bobby Jindal, offers any low-income child in the state, regardless of what public school they would attend, tuition assistance at private schools. It’s something liberals fear will become commonplace in other states in the future if conservative lawmakers get their way on education policy…

“…Meanwhile, voucher opponents focus on the potential losses to public schools such policies threaten. Each time a student leaves with a voucher, schools lose the funding they would otherwise have gotten. Yet their costs—for things like salaries and infrastructure—don’t go down because usually only a handful of kids leave.  (Supporters respond that enrollments fluctuate anyhow and that vouchers shouldn’t change the calculus much.) Conservative groups like the American Legislative Exchange Council have long supported vouchers as yet another way to privatize previously public institutions. Furthermore, private schools are often religiously affiliated, which means that through vouchers, public dollars can wind up supporting church-based institutions. This was a major point of contention in Louisiana, where one activist drew considerable attention to the program by identifying 19 of the 119 schools participating in the voucher program as having various anti-science curriculums. According to Mathis, top-notch private schools often aren’t interested in participating in voucher programs, so voucher programs end up supporting sketchier alternatives. On top of all this, opponents of vouchers argue that the policy doesn’t improve educational outcomes or performance.”

 

Scientists support renewable electricity standards

“The white paper comes as an increasing number of RESs in states are under attack. For instance, in North Carolina a bill has been working its way through the legislature that would repeal the state’s RES. The bill comes despite the popularity of renewables in the state, and despite the original bill having bipartisan support.

“This is happening across the country. “Of the 30 RES policies in place, 14 were enacted with Republican governors in office and half had either Republican control of both houses of the state legislature or two houses that were split between Democrats and Republicans,” UCS said. “Recently, however, renewable energy has become more politically divisive. Attacks on RES policies are now being led by organizations such as the American Legislative Exchange Council, Beacon Hill Institute, and Heritage Foundation, which often receive funding from fossil fuel interests and use biased analysis to advocate for the repeal or scaling back of RES policies.”

Campaign contribution disclosure, the perfect storm at the SEC

“Ten well-recognized academics, several advocacy organizations, some Congress members, and hundreds of thousands of petitioners have patiently been waiting for the new Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Commissioner Mary Jo White to rule on a petition for disclosure of all political campaign contributions to shareholders.

“McGarrah referred to the stampede of corporations that left membership at the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) in 2012 due to the expose of the organization’s involvement together with the National Rifle Association’s (NRA) in the Stand Your Ground legislation, believed to be an important factor in increasing gun violence in the United States.”

Green Desert: Don’t leave climate change off curriculum

“The lack of a broad-based understanding of the science of climate change among American students has emerged as a major concern among science educators in the country.

“In a recent story broadcast on National Public Radio, Mark McCaffrey, programs and policy director at the National Center for Science Education, said only 1 in 5 students feel like they’ve got a good understanding of climate change from what they’ve learned in school, while surveys show two-thirds say they’re not learning much at all about it…

The important thing here is that climate change will be taught as science, not as a controversial theory or a point of debate — an approach advocated in model legislation called the Environmental Literacy Improvement Act, developed by the conservative American Legislative Exchange Council. The law, introduced or passed in various forms in a small number of states, characterizes the topic as controversial and calls for teaching different views on climate change as a way to help students develop “critical thinking” skills.”

 Kansas views on sales tax, legal fees, redistricting, school drug test

“When Gov. Sam Brownback said he intended to create jobs in Kansas, who knew he was talking about lawyers? Derek Schmidt, the Republican attorney general, has asked the Legislature to add $1.2 million to his two-year budget to help defend bad laws that Brownback signed this session. It’s worth noting that the Legislature didn’t pass these expensive laws in response to a groundswell from constituents. The drug-testing bill was pushed by the American Legislative Exchange Council, which works on behalf of corporations, including drug companies. The paycheck deduction bill was supported by the anti-union Kansas Chamber of Commerce. Those groups certainly got their money’s worth from the Legislature. Too bad taxpayers are left holding the bill.”

Column: Chris Fitzsimon on dark days in Raleigh

“If you were wondering if the tea-party crazy train was slowing down in Raleigh these days, the beginning of last week ought to remove any doubt. It’s actually picking up steam as it drags North Carolina further to the right and further out of the mainstream.

“The headline event was the long-awaited unveiling of the tax “reform” plan of the far-right Senate leadership, complete with its own website and slickly produced video featuring Senate President Pro Tem and likely U.S. Senate candidate Phil Berger standing in a factory while animation presenting misleading facts appear over his shoulder.”

“Fittingly, the week began as the News & Observer reported on the vast influence of the far-right American Legislative Exchange Council on the current General Assembly, with many bills coming straight from the group’s conservative and lobbyist-funded playbook.

 Star Ohio tax witness paid $150K a year by trust

“COLUMBUS, Ohio — COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – An Ohio Statehouse witness on tax and economic issues who’s relied upon for his objectivity draws a hefty stipend from a conservative trust fund, an Associated Press review has found.

“Retired Ohio University economics professor Richard Vedder has been paid a $150,000 annual consulting fee through the Alexandria, Va.-based Donors Trust, which supports free-market nonprofits focused on shrinking the role of government.

“Donors Trust’s stated mission is supporting charities that alleviate society’s most pressing needs by encouraging “private philanthropy and individual giving and responsibility as an answer to society’s needs, as opposed to government involvement.”

“Among its dozens of beneficiaries are universities and think tanks including the Cato Institute, Freedom Works, Americans for Prosperity and the American Legislative Exchange Council.”

Let’s take a closer look at some of those gifts Pennsylvania pols got: As I See It

“Here’s my list of the top 10 gifts that Pennsylvania politicians reported receiving in 2012:

“8) Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R-Butler)

“Mr. Smart Alec took $2,224 to attend two American Legislative Exchange Council meetings so he could learn how to cut and paste right-wing memos into legislative proposals.”

Animal cruelty laws stir free speech debate

“A feverish debate in Tennessee over a law that would compel people with video of alleged animal cruelty to hand a copy over to police has set off a debate about wider First Amendment issues.

“Lawmakers in Tennessee have passed a Livestock Cruelty Protection Act and sent it on to the state’s governor, Bill Haslam, to sign or veto. The measure is similar to laws in at least nine states.

“At the end of the day it’s about personal property rights or the individual right to privacy,” said Bill Meierling, a spokesman for he American Legislative Exchange Council, in a statement to the Huffington Post. “You wouldn’t want me coming into your home with a hidden camera.”

State ‘business climates’ — more myth than reality?

“Is there a “right business climate” to draw industries and jobs to a state? A look at the organizations that rank states on business climate suggests such rankings may be overblown, writes Neal Peirce.

“Another major rating system that Good Jobs First takes on is the annual report, “Rich States, Poor States” written by supply-side economist Arthur Laffer. It’s issued by ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council, with its support by major corporations and such major right-wing players as Charles and David Koch. Laffer’s chosen index items all favor lower taxes on corporations and the wealthy, reduced public revenues, and holding down workers’ earning power by restraining minimum-wages levels and weakening the bargaining power of unions.

“But Fisher’s study checked the five-year performance of states by Laffer’s 2007 ranking and found, in terms of actual economic growth, there was no tendency for better-ranked states to do any better or worse than lower-ranked states.