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5/15 ALEC/Koch Cabal Review of Articles, Proposed Laws & Conservative Initiatives

5/15 ALEC/Koch Cabal Review of Articles, Proposed Laws & Conservative Initiatives

By Bob Sloan

Below are stories, articles and material related to the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) and their corporate members, funders and supporters – that include the notorious Koch brothers, Charles and David.  Initiatives of ALEC and pursued by the Koch brothers and other conservatives are provided in one place for readers to review and study.

Click on headline to visit the sites and read the full article(s)…

Got Science? ALEC Threatens Food Safety With ‘Ag Gag’ Laws

“In an effort spearheaded by the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), and bankrolled by the Koch brothers and other corporate sponsors, state legislatures in most major agricultural states are being beset this year with so-called “ag-gag” bills — repressive and misguided legislation that proposes to make it a crime to photograph or videotape operations at factory farms where animals are being raised. 

“The problem with such legislation,” says Doug Gurian-Sherman, senior scientist in the Union of Concerned Scientists’ food and environment program, “is that industries that should be cleaning up their practices are instead digging in their heels to try to shield their actions even further from the public eye.” As Gurian-Sherman explains, both science and democracy demand transparency. “In a democracy, and in the marketplace, information is critical and the public has a real right to know about the food they buy,” he says. “These laws move in the wrong direction from the standpoint of public health and safety.”

 

Analysis – States’ bids to slash renewables targets slows US progress

UNITES STATES: Anti-renewables legislation being proposed in many states is hampering the growth of wind energy across the US, according to researchers and wind industry officials.

“Political attacks on renewables range from attempts to place moratoriums on new wind development in states such as New Hampshire and Vermont, to efforts to repeal or significantly roll back targets in North Carolina, Kansas and Ohio. Other states, including Connecticut, are looking at watering down their mandates by allowing electricity from large-scale hydro to be used to meet the requirements.

“This year, we saw bills introduced across the country that would have wiped out nearly 50% of the demand created through state policies,” a Vestas spokesman told Windpower Monthly.

“In all, according to a database compiled by the law firm Keyes, Fox & Wiedman, there have been at least 35 bills to weaken renewable portfolio standards (RPS) proposed in 16 of the 29 states that have them on the books.

“Activity to undermine the standards has been increasing, said Jeff Deyette, assistant energy research director at the Union of Concerned Scientists.”

These legislative state bills originate within ALEC, written with the help of oil and gas corporate members.  Once “adopted” by the full membership they are then distributed to each state as proposed and “necessary” laws by ALEC’s legislative members.  Corporate interests then contribute to campaigns of those lawmakers agreeing to support the legislation.

NC Moral Monday demonstrations bring more arrests

RALEIGH Nearly 200 protesters crowded inside the Legislative Building early Monday evening, singing, chanting and echoing many of the same concerns that demonstrators have for the past three Mondays.

As members of the state House of Representatives tended to business, North Carolinians dissatisfied with tax plans, education policies, health care proposals, welfare cuts, environmental deregulation and new voting policies grew louder and louder.

Forty-nine women and men were arrested, zip-ties binding their hands as they were walked onto a bus which took them to the Wake County Detention Center on Hammond Road for processing.

The week before, 30 people were arrested, and the week before that there were 17 arrests.

The protesters contend the new-to-power legislators are dismantling decades of progress in public education, race relations, environmental protections and more. They are critical of proposed tax reforms that they argue would offer big breaks for state residents who make the most while pulling more from those at the middle and lower-income rungs.

“In North Carolina, Gov. McCrory and his merry men, Tillis and Berger, are engaging in Robin Hood in reverse,” Barber told about 150 people gathered before the protest at Davie Street Presbyterian Church, about a mile from the Legislative Building.

Barber said at an organizing session that he thought the legislators should be more transparent. He argued that North Carolina’s Republican leaders entertain advice from American Legislative Exchange Council, a largely private conservative group backed by major corporations that proposes model legislation for like-minded lawmakers, but has little time for the NAACP and their critics.

“You should not be arresting us,” Barber said. “You should thank us for having the courage to tell it like it is.”

Between the Lines — We shouldn’t foot ALEC bill

“What could be wrong with South Dakota taxpayers footing the bill for legislators’ membership and travel to ALEC meetings?

“Especially when you consider that in December 2011, ALEC adopted model legislation, based on a Texas law, addressing the public disclosure of chemicals in drilling fluids used to extract natural gas through hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. The ALEC legislation, which has since provided the basis for similar bills submitted in five states, has been promoted as a victory for consumers’ right to know about potential drinking water contaminants.

“So, hooray for us taxpayers. Right?

“A close reading of the bill, however, reveals loopholes that would allow energy companies to withhold the names of certain fluid contents, for reasons including that they have been deemed trade secrets. Most telling, perhaps, the bill was sponsored within ALEC by ExxonMobil, one of the largest practitioners of fracking — something not explained when ALEC lawmakers introduced their bills back home.

Don’t squander travel money

“Argus Leader, Sioux Falls, S.D.: Sometimes the value of something is nowhere worth what it costs.

“We think that is the case of the recent debate over whether the state should pick up the tab for memberships and travel for all legislators to go to the American Legislative Exchange Council conferences.

“No matter where you are politically, it’s clear that the state shouldn’t buy memberships for everyone to belong to ALEC. It’s ridiculous that state taxpayers would pay those fees.

“It’s fine for lawmakers to pay their own membership and travel to any professional conference they choose, no matter who sponsors it. This group’s membership and conferences just are not something for which the taxpayer should be billed.”

From ALEC affiliated sources:

Competition improves education

 

“In a recent guest column, Rep. Franke Wilmer, an MSU professor, said, “Keep education system public, not privatized,” and said the Legislative session had many bills that bore a striking similarity to model bills from the legislative agenda of the corporate bill-mill American Legislative Exchange Council, or ALEC. Whether a particular bill is an ALEC bill, or written by a former ALEC member like the National Association of Charter Schools, a bad idea driven mainly by out-of-state interests is still a bad idea. Representative Wilmer mentions the American Legislative Exchange Council as if it were a bad organization. Google “ALEC” and you will find that it is a “Partnership of America’s state legislators and members of the private sector that works to advance free-market enterprise and limited government.” She says that it is driven mainly by out-of-state interests which gives a totally false impression that we Montanans are not concerned about improving education.

A response in needed! I too served the people of Montana. As a state senator I was on the Senate Education Committee, and am also the only first-year legislator ever appointed to the Legislative Council (now Legislative Services). As a member of the Council I was chairman of the committee on school construction. My committee and I visited, questioned, and listened to numerous school administrators, board members, and faculty around Montana…Two personal examples vividly show the difference between public and private education. New York state required public school students to pass a regents exam for each subject at the end of the year before moving on to the next year in that subject. At the private school regents exams were utilized at times, such as when I took Spanish I. We were required to take, and pass, a Spanish II regents exam at the end of our first semester. Yes, in one semester we accomplished what the public schools were accomplishing in two years. Next example. At Purdue I took a biology class. I literally did not have to study. We had covered the material thoroughly in high school.” 

Rich Danker: For real pension reform, inequality must be stressed

“Just a few years ago, pension reform appeared inevitable. The drop in asset prices during the financial crisis had left public pension funds trillions of dollars behind on meeting future obligations. The defined benefit model was under fire as unduly expensive.

“Utah in early 2010 passed a law to put new workers into 401(k)-style accounts. Later that year the American Legislative Exchange Council adopted model legislation (which I coauthored) that did the same thing. We thought this would take off around the country and save state and local governments from accumulating more pension debt.

Related article or content:

Surprise, Surprise: Pension Cuts Are Legal

“For the past year or so, as the public pension crisis has been exposed across the country, unions have cited the law as the reason that states cannot restrain their retirement system costs. Pension deals between government and workers are ironclad, their legal theory went, and compensation can’t be trimmed even for workers’ future years of service. So when three states, Colorado, Minnesota and South Dakota, cut the cost-of-living allowances (COLA) in their pension formula last year, their reform efforts were expected to be scuttled by the courts in favor of the union plaintiffs.

“Cutting the COLA is one of the reforms needed (along with rolling back excessive pension accruals, eliminating the practice of “spiking,” and raising the retirement age) to stave off pension insolvency. Along those lines, the American Legislative Exchange Council, an organization of nearly 2,000 conservative state legislators, earlier this year adopted model legislation drafted by the American Principles Project that caps pension payouts at the private sector median. By green-lighting the COLA adjustments, the two court rulings signal to lawmakers that they may proceed to do what’s needed to make their retirement systems sustainable.

 

 

5/14 – Today’s Review of ALEC/Koch Cabal Related Articles and Material

5/14 – Today’s Review of ALEC/Koch Cabal Related Articles and Material

 

Today’s stories, articles and material related to ALEC and the Koch funded conservative cabal.

Click on headline link to read the full article(s)…

Are Vouchers Dead?

“When news broke Tuesday that the Louisiana Supreme Court struck down Louisiana’s voucher system, which uses public dollars to pay for low-income students to go to private schools, the fight over vouchers made its way back into the headlines. The Louisiana program, pushed hard and publicly by Republican Governor Bobby Jindal, offers any low-income child in the state, regardless of what public school they would attend, tuition assistance at private schools. It’s something liberals fear will become commonplace in other states in the future if conservative lawmakers get their way on education policy…

“…Meanwhile, voucher opponents focus on the potential losses to public schools such policies threaten. Each time a student leaves with a voucher, schools lose the funding they would otherwise have gotten. Yet their costs—for things like salaries and infrastructure—don’t go down because usually only a handful of kids leave.  (Supporters respond that enrollments fluctuate anyhow and that vouchers shouldn’t change the calculus much.) Conservative groups like the American Legislative Exchange Council have long supported vouchers as yet another way to privatize previously public institutions. Furthermore, private schools are often religiously affiliated, which means that through vouchers, public dollars can wind up supporting church-based institutions. This was a major point of contention in Louisiana, where one activist drew considerable attention to the program by identifying 19 of the 119 schools participating in the voucher program as having various anti-science curriculums. According to Mathis, top-notch private schools often aren’t interested in participating in voucher programs, so voucher programs end up supporting sketchier alternatives. On top of all this, opponents of vouchers argue that the policy doesn’t improve educational outcomes or performance.”

 

Scientists support renewable electricity standards

“The white paper comes as an increasing number of RESs in states are under attack. For instance, in North Carolina a bill has been working its way through the legislature that would repeal the state’s RES. The bill comes despite the popularity of renewables in the state, and despite the original bill having bipartisan support.

“This is happening across the country. “Of the 30 RES policies in place, 14 were enacted with Republican governors in office and half had either Republican control of both houses of the state legislature or two houses that were split between Democrats and Republicans,” UCS said. “Recently, however, renewable energy has become more politically divisive. Attacks on RES policies are now being led by organizations such as the American Legislative Exchange Council, Beacon Hill Institute, and Heritage Foundation, which often receive funding from fossil fuel interests and use biased analysis to advocate for the repeal or scaling back of RES policies.”

Campaign contribution disclosure, the perfect storm at the SEC

“Ten well-recognized academics, several advocacy organizations, some Congress members, and hundreds of thousands of petitioners have patiently been waiting for the new Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Commissioner Mary Jo White to rule on a petition for disclosure of all political campaign contributions to shareholders.

“McGarrah referred to the stampede of corporations that left membership at the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) in 2012 due to the expose of the organization’s involvement together with the National Rifle Association’s (NRA) in the Stand Your Ground legislation, believed to be an important factor in increasing gun violence in the United States.”

Green Desert: Don’t leave climate change off curriculum

“The lack of a broad-based understanding of the science of climate change among American students has emerged as a major concern among science educators in the country.

“In a recent story broadcast on National Public Radio, Mark McCaffrey, programs and policy director at the National Center for Science Education, said only 1 in 5 students feel like they’ve got a good understanding of climate change from what they’ve learned in school, while surveys show two-thirds say they’re not learning much at all about it…

The important thing here is that climate change will be taught as science, not as a controversial theory or a point of debate — an approach advocated in model legislation called the Environmental Literacy Improvement Act, developed by the conservative American Legislative Exchange Council. The law, introduced or passed in various forms in a small number of states, characterizes the topic as controversial and calls for teaching different views on climate change as a way to help students develop “critical thinking” skills.”

 Kansas views on sales tax, legal fees, redistricting, school drug test

“When Gov. Sam Brownback said he intended to create jobs in Kansas, who knew he was talking about lawyers? Derek Schmidt, the Republican attorney general, has asked the Legislature to add $1.2 million to his two-year budget to help defend bad laws that Brownback signed this session. It’s worth noting that the Legislature didn’t pass these expensive laws in response to a groundswell from constituents. The drug-testing bill was pushed by the American Legislative Exchange Council, which works on behalf of corporations, including drug companies. The paycheck deduction bill was supported by the anti-union Kansas Chamber of Commerce. Those groups certainly got their money’s worth from the Legislature. Too bad taxpayers are left holding the bill.”

Column: Chris Fitzsimon on dark days in Raleigh

“If you were wondering if the tea-party crazy train was slowing down in Raleigh these days, the beginning of last week ought to remove any doubt. It’s actually picking up steam as it drags North Carolina further to the right and further out of the mainstream.

“The headline event was the long-awaited unveiling of the tax “reform” plan of the far-right Senate leadership, complete with its own website and slickly produced video featuring Senate President Pro Tem and likely U.S. Senate candidate Phil Berger standing in a factory while animation presenting misleading facts appear over his shoulder.”

“Fittingly, the week began as the News & Observer reported on the vast influence of the far-right American Legislative Exchange Council on the current General Assembly, with many bills coming straight from the group’s conservative and lobbyist-funded playbook.

 Star Ohio tax witness paid $150K a year by trust

“COLUMBUS, Ohio — COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – An Ohio Statehouse witness on tax and economic issues who’s relied upon for his objectivity draws a hefty stipend from a conservative trust fund, an Associated Press review has found.

“Retired Ohio University economics professor Richard Vedder has been paid a $150,000 annual consulting fee through the Alexandria, Va.-based Donors Trust, which supports free-market nonprofits focused on shrinking the role of government.

“Donors Trust’s stated mission is supporting charities that alleviate society’s most pressing needs by encouraging “private philanthropy and individual giving and responsibility as an answer to society’s needs, as opposed to government involvement.”

“Among its dozens of beneficiaries are universities and think tanks including the Cato Institute, Freedom Works, Americans for Prosperity and the American Legislative Exchange Council.”

Let’s take a closer look at some of those gifts Pennsylvania pols got: As I See It

“Here’s my list of the top 10 gifts that Pennsylvania politicians reported receiving in 2012:

“8) Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R-Butler)

“Mr. Smart Alec took $2,224 to attend two American Legislative Exchange Council meetings so he could learn how to cut and paste right-wing memos into legislative proposals.”

Animal cruelty laws stir free speech debate

“A feverish debate in Tennessee over a law that would compel people with video of alleged animal cruelty to hand a copy over to police has set off a debate about wider First Amendment issues.

“Lawmakers in Tennessee have passed a Livestock Cruelty Protection Act and sent it on to the state’s governor, Bill Haslam, to sign or veto. The measure is similar to laws in at least nine states.

“At the end of the day it’s about personal property rights or the individual right to privacy,” said Bill Meierling, a spokesman for he American Legislative Exchange Council, in a statement to the Huffington Post. “You wouldn’t want me coming into your home with a hidden camera.”

State ‘business climates’ — more myth than reality?

“Is there a “right business climate” to draw industries and jobs to a state? A look at the organizations that rank states on business climate suggests such rankings may be overblown, writes Neal Peirce.

“Another major rating system that Good Jobs First takes on is the annual report, “Rich States, Poor States” written by supply-side economist Arthur Laffer. It’s issued by ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council, with its support by major corporations and such major right-wing players as Charles and David Koch. Laffer’s chosen index items all favor lower taxes on corporations and the wealthy, reduced public revenues, and holding down workers’ earning power by restraining minimum-wages levels and weakening the bargaining power of unions.

“But Fisher’s study checked the five-year performance of states by Laffer’s 2007 ranking and found, in terms of actual economic growth, there was no tendency for better-ranked states to do any better or worse than lower-ranked states.

05/05 Daily Report on Activities, Legislation and Initiatives of the ALEC/Koch Cabal

05/05 Daily Report on Activities, Legislation and Initiatives of the ALEC/Koch Cabal

By Bob Sloan

Below are today’s articles and materials related to ALEC and the Koch funded conservative cabal.  Included ALEC published material – if available.

Click on a link to view the complete article.

Scientific American: North Carolina legislators make end-run on science and renewable energy

From “The Raw Story”

North Carolina Republicans push through anti-renewable energy bill in ‘banana republic’ vote:

“Democrats in North Carolina say they could have defeated a bill to repeal renewable energy subsidies on Wednesday if Republicans had not pushed it through committee without counting the votes.

The state Senate Finance Committee debated the bill to end the state’s 6-year-old renewable energy program for over 40 minutes before Republican chairman Bill Rabon called for a motion. … “North Carolina is not a banana republic,” Sen. Josh Stein (D) complained following the hearing. “That was no way to run a proceeding.”

Environmental advocates have suggested that Republicans based the bill on model legislation from the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). Republican state Rep. Mike Hager, who authored the bill, is an ALEC member.

Moffitt skips House session to attend conservative conference

ASHEVILLE — Rep. Tim Moffitt skipped a session of the state House, along with Republican Speaker Thom Tillis, to attend a conference of a controversial pro-business group in Oklahoma.

Moffitt, R-Asheville, was recently appointed to the board of the American Legislative Exchange Council, a group that supports limited government and free markets. Tillis is also a board member.

Ag-Gag Laws Could Make America Sick

Against these criticisms, farm industry advocates argue that activists often misportray what actually happens on farms, turning isolated incidents into inflammatory narratives of routine abuse that further anti-meat-eating goals. The industry also portrays undercover video-taking as a violation of farmer rights.

“At the end of the day it’s about personal property rights or the individual right to privacy,” said Bill Meierling, a spokesman for the American Legislative Exchange Council, a conservative business group that drafted the model for many of the ag-gag laws, to the Associated Press. “You wouldn’t want me coming into your home with a hidden camera.”

Exposed: How Murdoch, Bill Gates and Big Corporations are Data Mining our Schools

Besides New York and Louisiana, inBloom has contracts with seven other states. All are part of the Shared Learning Collaborative, a pilot program set up by the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) to help implement Common Core standards through the tracking of student data. The Council of Chiefs, also a non-profit, is composed of the heads of America’s state school systems who work together with corporations to collectively design education policy, in mold of the American Legislative Exchange Council, or ALEC. 

North Carolina Republicans push through anti-renewable energy bill in ‘banana republic’ vote

“Democrats in North Carolina say they could have defeated a bill to repeal renewable energy subsidies on Wednesday if Republicans had not pushed it through committee without counting the votes.

“Environmental advocates have suggested that Republicans based the bill on model legislation from the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). Republican state Rep. Mike Hager, who authored the bill, is an ALEC member.

The Future of the Climate Debate Is in the Laboratories of Democracy

“A key fight over efforts to curb climate change is happening in the relative anonymity of various state legislatures. This week, Colorado voted to increase its use of renewable energy, while the North Carolina State Senate voted to do the opposite. But only one side won.

“Opponents in North Carolina were bolstered by support from various conservative groups, a number of which have made the repeal of renewable standards a key priority. The News & Observer notes that “American Conservative Union, Americans for Tax Reform and The Heartland Institute are among the organizations pushing to make North Carolina a testing ground for rolling back policies that favor renewable energy.” Those groups aren’t alone. The conservative American Legislative Exchange Council has similarly targeted the policies, prompting a number of renewable companies to end their memberships. Several of the organizations, including ALEC and the Heartland Institute have ties to the fossil fuel industry — which supports rollbacks of renewable energy standards for fairly obvious reasons.” 

Fossil Fuel Empire Strikes Back…At Clean Energy

Front Groups do the Dirty Work for Oil and Gas Industry

“So far, 29 states have implemented Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) programs that require increased production of energy from renewable sources such as solar, wind, geothermal and biomass. They’ve been adopted in red states and blue – from California to Texas to Maine – through democratic processes and with popular support. RPS programs have helped jumpstart an industry that is spurring economic development, creating American jobs, boosting energy independence and cutting our carbon footprint.

“The groups may sound familiar: American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), which is currently pushing legislation around the country that would mandate the teaching of climate change denial in public school systems, and The Heartland Institute, which ran a billboard campaign last year comparing global warming “admitters” to Osama bin Laden and Charles Manson. Both have long opposed sensible energy policies. And their funders will sound familiar, too: the oil, gas and coal industries and their owners like the Koch Brothers.” 

State House leaders off to ALEC

“As House lawmakers debated whether to halve the number of North Carolina children eligible for free pre-kindergarten, several key members were missing from the chamber.

“House Speaker Thom Tillis, Rep. Tim Moffitt, R-Buncombe, and Rep. Jason Saine, R-Lincoln, left early Thursday to attend the ALEC Spring Task Force meeting in Oklahoma City, scheduled for Thursday and Friday.

“According to Tillis spokesman Jordan Shaw, the only state funds spent were for registration fees – a practice also extended for legislators’ trips to other conferences, like the National Conference of State Legislators.

“ALEC, or the American Legislative Exchange Council, describes itself as a free-market, limited-government group.”

Nullification: How States Are Making It a Felony to Enforce Federal Gun Laws

“In mid-April, Kansas passed a law asserting that federal gun regulations do not apply to guns made and owned in Kansas. Under the law, Kansans could manufacture and sell semi-automatic weapons in-state without a federal license or any federal oversight.

“Kansas’ “Second Amendment Protection Act” backs up its states’ rights claims with a penalty aimed at federal agents: when dealing with “Made in Kansas” guns, any attempt to enforce federal law is now a felony. Bills similar to Kansas’ law have been introduced in at least 37 other states. An even broader bill is on the desk of Alaska Gov. Sean Parnell. That bill would exempt any gun owned by an Alaskan from federal regulation. In Missouri, a bill declaring federal gun laws “null and void” passed by an overwhelming majority in the state house, and is headed for debate in the senate.”

International:

More US companies looking to relocate to Britain to dodge corporate tax.

Firms rush to relocate in low-tax Britain

More than 40 multinational companies have inquired about relocating their headquarters to the UK because of the cuts in corporation tax.

Steve Varley, the UK chairman of Ernst & Young, revealed that the accountancy firm knew of the significant number of firms seeking to relocate from countries such as the USA, as well as from the Netherlands, Switzerland and Ireland.

The high figure will be a boost to George Osborne, the Chancellor, who has made Britain’s lower rates of corporation tax a centrepiece of Government policy. The advertising giant, WPP, recently announced that it would move back to the UK from its present headquarters in Dublin.

“I know of more than 40 multinational companies that have been looking to undertake global and regional headquarter relocations into Britain,” Mr Varley said.

Are renewables doomed to failure in Australia?

“Across the United States right now, a pitched battle is being fought over the future of renewable energy targets in the 29 states that have them. Already, 16 of these states are considering legislation – templated by a fossil fuel-sponsored lobby group, the American Legislative Exchange Council – to repeal or dilute the ambition of renewable standards.

“So far, the campaign – boosted by Tea Party radicals in the Republican movement – has not been successful. In the past week, North Carolina rejected the idea after leading utilities such as Duke Energy, and big data centre operators such as Apple and Google expressed their support for wind and solar projects.

“The new energy minister in WA, Mike Nahan, has upped the ante – possibly in anticipation of the Coalition winning the federal poll in September.

“Nahan is an interesting choice as energy minister. For supporters of renewable energy, he’s actually quite a frightening one.

“The American-born Nahan is a former executive director of the conservative, pro-market, anti-renewable think tank, the Institute of Public Affairs, which is so intertwined with conservative policy making that many Coalition politicians refer journalists to the IPA for comment on issues such as energy and climate.

“A collection of Nahan’s thoughts on climate and energy can be found on the IPA website as, like his contemporaries and successors, he was a prolific contributor to (mostly Murdoch-owned) newspapers. They give an interesting insight into his views on all things climate, energy and environment.”

05/01 Daily Report on Activities, Legislation and Initiatives of the ALEC/Koch Cabal

05/01 Daily Report on Activities, Legislation and Initiatives of the ALEC/Koch Cabal

By Bob Sloan

Below are today’s articles and materials related to ALEC and the Koch funded conservative cabal.  Included ALEC published material – if available.

Click on a link to view the complete article.

First “Ag-Gag” Prosecution: This Utah Woman Filmed a Slaughterhouse from the Public Street

“This is the first prosecution in the country under one of these laws, which are designed to silence undercover investigators who expose animal welfare abuses on factory farms. The legislation is a direct response to a series of shocking investigations by groups like the Humane Society, Mercy for Animals, and Compassion Over Killing that have led to plant closures, public outrage, and criminal charges against workers.

“Even the most sweeping ag-gag bills, such as the American Legislative Exchange Council model legislation, don’t explicitly target filming from a roadside. But Nebraska, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Vermont are all considering bills similar to the Utah law right now.”

Renewable energy becomes a utility lifeline

“When North Carolina Republicans brought forth a bill pushed by the conservative lobbying group ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council, to gut the state’s renewable energy standards, they figured they had a model piece of pro-business legislation that would sail through the legislature this year.

“But, as North American Windpower gleefully reported, it died in committee. Key to the story is the committee where it died — public utilities and energy.”

The Oil And Gas Industry’s Assault On Renewable Energy

A Bloomberg article released last week details how the oil and gas industry, through some self-described free market organizations that they fund, are trying to engineer a legislative massacre of these policies in more than a dozen states.

“The groups may sound familiar: American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), which is currently pushing legislation around the country that would mandate the teaching of climate change denial in public school systems, and The Heartland Institute, which ran a billboard campaign last year comparing global warming “admitters” to Osama bin Laden and Charles Manson. Both have long opposed sensible energy policies. And their funders will sound familiar, too: the oil, gas and coal industries and their owners like the Koch Brothers.”

A Movement Is Needed to Get Corporations to Disclose All Their Political Spending. Let’s Start It

“Among those pressuring companies to be more forthcoming is Rob McGarrah of the AFL-CIO’s Office of Investment. The union owns shares of stock in many companies, including Cigna, and is asking them to provide shareholders and the public with a more complete accounting of spending to influence public policy.

“McGarrah was unsuccessful in persuading Cigna to disclose “special assessments” on behalf of AHIP and other groups, so the AFL-CIO submitted a shareholder resolution that would compel the company to report indirect funding of lobbying through trade associations and tax-exempt organizations, such as the American Legislative Exchange Council, which drafts “model legislation” to protect business interests.”

ALEC-Orchestrated Bill To Preempt Paid Sick Leave Passes Florida Senate

“But “preemption bills,” laws orchestrated by the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) that override any efforts to implement paid sick days, are also gaining speed, with the latest passed by Florida’s state Senate on Friday. The bill, which had huge support from Disney World, Darden Restaurants (owner of Olive Garden and Red Lobster), and the Florida Chamber of Commerce, would delay local government efforts to adopt paid sick leave policies.”

How to get to work on time in Russia (and more from In Other News)

“Prodded by the meat and poultry industries, state legislators nationwide are introducing laws making it harder for animal-welfare advocates to investigate cruelty and food-safety cases. Measures in Indiana, Arkansas and Pennsylvania, for example, would outlaw videotaping agricultural operations. Iowa already made it illegal to deny belonging to an animal-welfare organization when applying for a farm job. Other bills are pending in California, Nebraska and Tennessee. The force behind this legislative agenda, whose purpose, Paul Shapiro, vice president of farm animal protection for the Humane Society of the United States, insisted, “is to prevent any pattern of abuse from being documented,” is the American Legislative Exchange Council. It labels those who interfere with animal operations “terrorists” and titled the California bill the “Animal and Ecological Terrorist Act,” although an ALEC official admitted “Freedom to Farm Act” would’ve sounded better. (Associated Press)”

Governor Mary Fallin to Address Legislators from Across the United States

“OKLAHOMA CITY  —  Governor Mary Fallin will speak to hundreds of state legislators from across the country on Thursday at the American Legislative Exchange Council’s Spring Task Force Summit. The two day summit will be held this year at the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City.

“Fallin, who was named a “Legislator of the Year” by ALEC while serving as a state representative, will discuss this year’s legislative session and highlight the success of pro-growth policies in Oklahoma.”

LETTER: ALEC too far right for these groups

“The American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) is a group promoting far-right legislation. Its tax exempt status is currently challenged, as its sole purpose is to formulate legislation promoting extremely conservative points of view and helping the rich and powerful maintain their status.

“The South Dakota Legislative Board has voted to spend our tax dollars to pay for membership dues for all our state legislature’s members and all their expenses to attend ALEC meetings.”

ALEC related material published or distributed by ALEC…

National Center for Public Policy Research to Participate in Five Shareholder Meetings this Week, Bringing Total to 18 So Far for this Shareholder Meeting Season

“Washington, D.C. – The National Center for Public Policy Research will directly address five major U.S. corporations this week as part of the National Center’s Free Enterprise Project, which calls major corporations to account for activities that undermine the free market and/or a free and prosperous United States.

“Activities of particular interest include 1) corporations engaging in cronyist practices that suck money from taxpayers; 2) corporations lobbying to expand the size of government; 3) corporations imposing expensive private regulatory regimes on suppliers, often for greenwashing purposes, in the name of “sustainability;” and 4) corporations caving in to ridiculous left-wing demands, for example, demands to shun the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC).

“The National Center also attends meetings to compliment CEOs who stand up for freedom and the free market.”

4/27 Daily Report on Activities, Legislation and Initiatives of the ALEC/Koch Cabal

4/27 Daily Report on Activities, Legislation and Initiatives of the ALEC/Koch Cabal

alec for dummies (2)

Daily reports on articles and material related to the American Legislative Exchange Council.  Below are links to important stories covering 4/26 and 4/27…

Report by Progress Missouri Highlights ALEC Infiltration in MO

More than forty bills introduced in the Missouri state legislature echo American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) model legislation, and at least 60 legislators are ALEC members, according to a new report from Progress Missouri.

Bills like so-called right to work laws, resolutions supporting the Keystone XL pipeline, a “parent trigger act” to accelerate the privatization of public schools, and an array of bills that construct legal and financial shields for corporations whose products injure or kill can be traced back to ALEC model legislation.

Tell ALEC Members They’re Not OK

“ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council, is bringing its anti-worker agenda to Oklahoma City on May 2-3 at its “Spring Task Force Summit.” At the summit, corporations, political contributors and state lawmakers will meet behind closed doors. The corporations will give lawmakers copies of the legislation they want to empower CEOs and billionaires while undermining democracy, weakening workers’ rights, eradicating public education and eliminating environmental and consumer protections.

“Sign the petition today to say that you are committed to telling your union brothers and sisters, family, neighbors and friends about the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) and that you are also committed to joining the action against ALEC in Oklahoma City on May 2-3 or raising your voice against ALEC on Facebook and Twitter on those days.”

‘Factory Farms’ Aren’t Farms: They Are Concentration Camps for Animals

“Oddly, each of these state proposals is practically identical, even including much of the same wording. That’s because, unbeknownst to the public and other legislators, the bills don’t originate from the state lawmakers who introduce them. Instead, they come from a Washington-based corporate front group named ALEC — the American Legislative Exchange Council.” 

Lawmakers should not ask state to pay for their memberships in conservative group

“The Legislature’s Executive Board, dominated by Republicans, decided this week that the state treasury should pay the $100 memberships for all 105 South Dakota legislators in an organization called the American Legislative Exchange Council, and also foot the bill for unlimited out-of-state trips to ALEC events by state lawmakers who serve on ALEC committees.

“That’s an issue because ALEC – described on its own website as “a nonpartisan membership association for conservative state lawmakers” – is not nonpartisan in the sense that an organization such as the National Conference of State Legislatures is.”

 National Center Policy Experts Quiz Pfizer CEO Ian Read and Johnson & Johnson CEO Alex Gorsky

Short Hills, NJ / New Brunswick, NJ / Washington, D.C. – Policy experts from the National Center for Public Policy Research attended the shareholder meetings of both Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson in New Jersey today, seeking answers from CEOs Ian Read and Alex Gorsky, respectively, on timely public policy issues including the government’s possible abuse of the “academic detailing” portion of the 2009 stimulus bill, the need to repeal the innovation- and job-killing medical device tax, and Johnson & Johnson’s decision to drop membership in the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) after originally sticking with it.” 

Rep. Greg Forristall Ignores Public Records Request, Claims All Iowa Legislators are ALEC Members

Click here to send a message directly to Rep. Forristall. Tell him to let Iowans fully participate in the democratic process.

“Rep. Greg Forristall ignored a request to release information about the May 2-3 meeting of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), where he will serve as Chair of the Education Task Force, according to correspondence released by Progress Iowa today. Forristall also claimed that all Iowa legislators are members of ALEC, despite reports to the contrary from members of the Iowa House and Senate.” 

How renewable energy won in North Carolina

“From the moment talk of repealing the state’s renewable energy standard began intensifying following last year’s election among conservative groups that have long denied the reality of global warming, the state’s sustainable energy industry and environmental advocates pushed back by focusing on the law’s track record of creating jobs and other economic benefits.

“The N.C. Sustainable Energy Association, an industry lobby group, commissioned an economic analysis of the law, which passed in 2007 by a wide bipartisan margin and was the first of its kind in the Southeast. Released in February, the study conducted by RTI International and La Capra Associates found that North Carolina’s law has been a driver of clean energy development, which in turn as been an important job creator for the state.”

California’s Factory Farms: Corporate-Run Concentration Camps for Pigs, Cows and Chickens

“Yet here comes a mess of so-called “conservatives” attempting to use state government to outlaw messengers who shine a light on corporate wrongdoing — turning those who expose crimes into criminals. Even kookier, these repressive laws declare that truth-tellers who so much as annoy or embarrass the corporate owner of the animal factory are guilty of “an act of terrorism.”

“The freedom-busting terrorists in this fight are not those who reveal the abuse, but the soulless factory-farm profiteers in the corporate suites and the cynical lawmakers who serve them.

“Oddly, each of these state proposals is practically identical, even including much of the same wording. That’s because, unbeknownst to the public and other legislators, the bills don’t originate from the state lawmakers who introduce them. Instead, they come from a Washington-based corporate front group named ALEC — the American Legislative Exchange Council.”

Setting the Record Straight on School Vouchers (NC)

RALEIGH — Critics of school vouchers have been out in force recently, particularly in the pages of the News & Observer. For example, last week Yevonne Brannon and Nick Rhodes declared in an op-ed that “school vouchers are wrong for NC.” Let’s take a look at their opposition to House Bill 944: Opportunity Scholarship Act.

11. “North Carolina’s voucher proposal is clearly linked to ‘model’ legislation being pushed in state legislatures by the controversial American Legislative Exchange Council.” 

Actually, House Bill 944 is “linked” to Milton Friedman’s 1955 essay, “The Role of Government in Education.”

Hunhoff Blasts Travel Spending

“South Dakota legislative democrats are upset that the Executive Board has authorized lawmakers to be reimbursed for trips to meetings of the “American Legislative Exchange Council” or “ALEC.” House Minority Leader Bernie Hunhoff of Yankton says the extra travel money was added late in the session, which is an issue in itself.”

“Hunhoff says ALEC is a “right wing, extremist lobbying organization,”