K12, Inc. Advertising Misses a Few Key Points

CEO Ronald Packard’s $5 million salary? Not mentioned.

Nor does K12 mention of the fact that it spent over $26 million on advertising in 2010; or the fact that this advertising budget came from public tax dollars – funds that were supposed to be used educating students.  That $26 million came largely from the money YOU paid in taxes for the purpose of educating ALL Kansas’ students.

K12’s advertising fails to mention its role in efforts to suppress the teaching of evolution in Kansas. K12 also fails to mention how its “flexible” Texas curriculum allows parents to accept or reject specific topics within state-required courses such as biology.

Some teachers wind up with as many as 300 students, and this takes a toll on the curriculum. K12 opted out of sharing the words of parents who spoke to the New York Times, one of whom said “…teachers are not able to keep up with 300 students. The kids are losing out… my son was exempted from “The Great Gatsby” because of the workload of the teacher.”

Finally, K12, Inc.’s advertising fails to mention that the growing for-profit online school market continues to be a major priority for the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). ALEC, a driving force behind voter-supression and other legislation aimed at disenfranchising the working class, now puts a price tag on our students.

“Which CEO made $5 million stealing your kid’s lunch money?” a new informational video, (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUBopyWXmAw) covers much of what K12, Inc. selectively ignores. Grassroots efforts like this one won’t air on network television or top-rated radio stations, so you’ll have to make the effort to watch it yourself and share it with others.

To read about all of the other key points that K12 advertising does not mention, please click here so that you can spread the word about K12 and ALEC.