AFSCME

Activists, Union Workers and Chicagoan’s Prepare for ALEC’s August Conference

Activists, Union Workers and Chicagoan’s Prepare for ALEC’s August Conference

by Bob Sloan

The American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) plans to celebrate their 40th birthday from August 7th to the 9th this year.  A big event for this predominantly conservative organization, to be sure.  The birthday bash coincides with ALEC’s Annual Meeting – one of several key events held annually where corporate prepared legislation is introduced to more than 2,000 state lawmakers to be carried back to their home turf and introduced as proposed new laws.

This year the ALEC Annual Meeting will differ from 37 of the previous 39 such meetings as activists, American workers, protesters and Anarchists are preparing a rousing “welcome” for ALEC’s members – corporate and legislative – when they arrive in Chicago.  Similar protests and rallies against ALEC have marked each of their yearly events since April 2011 when a small group of students and liberal activists held the very first Anti-ALEC protest in Cincinnati.  Following that protest a whistleblower came forward and released hundreds of secret ALEC documents and proposed “model legislation” to the Center for Media and Democracy.  CMD launched “ALEC Exposed” at PRWatch and published the documents for American’s to read, evaluate and discuss.  As more and more citizens became aware of ALEC, the groundswell of anger over such manipulation of our daily lives by a corporate “charity” grew…as did the number of protests.

Following Cincy, protesters and activists followed ALEC to New Orleans for the next meeting…then to Phoenix, Charlotte, Salt Lake City, Oklahoma City and now they’re preparing for Chicago and perhaps the largest turnout of protesters yet.  The growth of ALEC protesters has grown in part due to the involvement of America’s workers – union and non-union – who continue to suffer job losses and lack of available jobs due to ALEC’s pursuits of Right To Work (for less) and other initiatives to abolish organized labor or diminish their voices.  In Oklahoma this spring, the AFLCIO and Teamsters organized the ALEC protest and are again at the front in Chicago.  Their involvement and reporting on ALEC’s non union activities has attracted other strong unions such as AFSCME to participate in the Windy City protest.

At each subsequent ALEC event, the numbers of protesters have grown as more and more has become known about ALEC and their activities.  The public has become knowledgeable about some of the more oppressive laws beneficial to corporate interests disseminated by ALEC and passed through lobbying and campaign contributions from ALEC’s corporate membership.  These include such laws and initiatives as; Right To Work, voter ID legislation and suppression, stand your ground (Trayvon Martin), privatization of public schools, vouchers and “virtual” education (all of which benefit one or more of ALEC’s corporate members) and tort reforms that limit the ability of consumers to recover damages from malpractice or product related injury (such as cancer and illness from asbestos contamination).

Occupy Wall Street and other Occupy groups have also joined the ranks of those opposing ALEC, calling for Americans to turn-out and protest in Chicago.  Through it all, ALEC has maintained a staunch “fuck you” stance against all who oppose them and their agenda by continuing to advocate for corporate interests over the rights of Americans.  They enlisted the help of other right-wing think tanks in an attempt to deflect some of the bad publicity about them and more recently have attempted to avoid referring to themselves and their members as “ALEC” by requesting that the organization now be called the “Exchange Council” to avoid the stigma that has attached to “ALEC” since 2011.

ALEC decided to hold this bash in Chicago where the IRS Exempt 501 (c)(3) “charity” was born in 1973, formed by several disgruntled conservative Republicans looking for a way to change the course of the Republican party and eventually the path of the United States to one of conservative principles; limited government, free markets, individual liberty and federalism at the state level.  As with most terminology used by ALEC’s wordsmiths, the definition of these terms to ALEC supporters is far different than what one would find in Websters.  By founding ALEC as a “Charity” it has allowed ALEC to amass tens of millions of dollars to use in legislative efforts – without declaring or paying any taxes on those millions.  Further it allows individuals and corporate interests to also deduct their ALEC contributions, given in pursuit of seeking corporate-friendly legislation that fattens their bottom line(s).

Since 2011 there have been three complaints filed with the IRS, asking that agency to investigate ALEC’s use of “charitable” funds to advance legislation and promote lobbying, in violation of the 501 (c)(3) provisions and requesting that the charitable classification be rescinded and the government recover any taxes that should have been paid on money used to lobby and influence legislation.  All of these complaints are now pending and under consideration by the IRS.  VLTP is a complainant in one of those whistleblower complaints and awaits a determination by the IRS on the documents provided in that complaint.

To ALEC, limited government is defined as limiting the government’s ability to regulate actions of corporations, manufacturers or businesses that may cause harm to Americans. Individual liberty is seen as corporate liberty…the ability to operate without government interference at the sacrifice of true individual liberties of Americans.

Free-Markets are those markets controlled by ALEC’s more than 350 large, multinational companies that control specific markets by limiting the abilities of true small businesses to break into existing markets.

Federalism is perceived by ALEC as: “a government closest to the people is fundamentally more effective, more just, and a better guarantor of freedom than the distant, bloated federal government in Washington, D.C.”  In other words, since ALEC has a vast influence over state legislatures through membership and control of governor’s mansions in many states, turn over federal control to the states (and through them, ALEC) to run our country.

ALEC has been hugely successful in many of their hidden initiatives designed to meet their twisted definitions of such terms as federalism and free markets.  As an example we have only to look to the ongoing battles in Wisconsin (Governor Walker, an ALEC alum), Arizona (Governor Brewer and ALEC Alum), Ohio (Governor Kasich an ALEC alum) and South Carolina (Governor Haley another ALEC alum).  In each of these – and several other – states, the ALEC agenda has been pushed down the throat of voters by legislatures controlled by ALEC members and Governors who are members of ALEC’s large alumni pool; repeal of clean energy regulations, eliminating worker rights, lowering wages and attempting to abolish minimum wage, ending collective bargaining, privatizing our schools, prisons and government institutions, making it more difficult for minorities to vote and restricting women’s rights.

For all these reasons, ALEC must be pursued and abolished before our country can begin to heal and return to a form of democratic government on behalf of the people rather than the corporate interests and elite business owners.  Chicago next month is only the “next step” in the process of returning state governments to the will of the people and wrenching power from those who get such power by doing the bidding of their corporate masters through ALEC.

We hope that many readers will turn out for the various rallies and protests in Chicago (Unions planning a large event on August 8th at ALEC’s Palmer House Hotel).  If you are unable to attend, please consider contributing to the efforts of those organizations participating; VLTP, CMD, Common Cause, AFLCIO, AFSCME, PFAW, etc.  Your dollar may be the one that finally breaks ALEC’s stranglehold on our nation…

Lawmakers Lambaste Money-Losing Prison Industries Program

Lawmakers Lambaste Money-Losing Prison Industries Program

We have been posting about an investigation into prison labor violations in Nevada.  Three posts by VLTP Executive Director Bob Sloan, which you can access here, here, and here.  After exposing this to the entire Nevada State Legislature, Governor Sandoval (R), AG Masto (D), and Union leaders, and aided by an interview on the Dana Gentry Show just over a month ago, the ball started rolling fast. 

Elected leaders and Union leaders realized that they were being  at the least, misled by DOC Chief Cox and Nevada Department of Corrections Public Information Officer Brian Connett (who, not so incidentally, also NCIA logo  serves as the head of NCIA and is likely guilty of a serious conflict of interest) and reacted quickly to the information provided to them by Bob.

 

Today, elected officials had a special hearing to address the information about Messrs. Cox and Connett.  Many questions were obviously formed from the Cox and Connettinvestigative report that Bob had  researched and submitted to the Legislature, Governor, Attorney General and Secretary of State.

The following article from the Las Vegas Sun – complete with Bob’s comments – show that there are a lot of powerful people who are very upset and embarrassed about being defrauded.  The disgust was bipartisan, as the impact on Nevada taxpayers and the abuse of prison laborers united both progressives and conservatives in condemning the actions of Cox and Connett.

There is still a lot more to happen until this situation is fully and properly resolved, including what to do about the legal transgressions and tax issues. This issue will be discussed next at an open meeting of the Nevada commission sometime later this month. Bob Sloan will be writing his own article on the events to date, but for now I’d like to present you with the MSM Newspaper coverage of today’s events to bring you up-to-speed on what is happening as the result of Bob’s investigation for VLTP.  All emphasis is mine.

————————————-

From the Las Vegas Sun, by   (contact)

Friday, March 8, 2013 | 4:03 p.m. CARSON CITY — Legislators lambasted the state’s prison industry program Friday. They bemoaned the financial losses the program has incurred during the past few years and further decried the possibility that prisoners could be unduly competing with the private sector for scarce jobs.

“It appears that at some point the reserves are going to run out, but in the meantime, it’s a loss-loss across the state,” Assembly Speaker Marilyn Kirkpatrick, D-North Las Vegas, said at a legislative committee meeting, noting that the state would lose money and the private sector could lose jobs.

The prison industries program uses voluntary prison labor to run various shops with some proceeds from sales paying for restitution and room and board for prisoners; the prisoners receive training and skills they can later use to find a job when they are no longer incarcerated.

Department of Corrections chief Greg Cox conceded that the program has been a money loser during recent years but still defended the merits of the Silver State Industries program.

“We have been able to say historically this is helping us operate our facilities, it’s a good management tool, and it provides vocational training,” he told legislators. “The cold hard facts are now that we have to aggressively look at what industries are not turning a profit.”

The prison industries’ furniture and metal shop, auto and upholstery shop, and drapery shop have lost hundreds of thousands of dollars during the past few years.

Others, like the mattress, print and garment shops have turned small profits. But those surpluses aren’t enough to offset losses in the other shops, and the department has been drawing down reserves as a result.

“This is a clear track into the dirt, and without substantial retooling, it’ll be in the hole,” Assemblyman David Bobzien, D-Reno, said.

Bobzien and Assemblyman Michael Sprinkle, D-Sparks, tried to wrangle an answer from Cox about which programs would be cut and what the department would do to get its industry program on a sustainable track.

Cox said he’s “very pessimistic” about future revenues and that “when resources go, of course programs will go.”

He cited the auto shop, the biggest money loser, as one program that could be under the chopping block.

Cox faced further criticism for the prison industry’s public-private partnership with Alpine Steel, which owes the state about $400,000.

The company also got a below-market rate lease to operate within High Desert State Prison, which Bobzien called an unfair subsidy.

The challenge of convincing a business to work within a prison environment necessitated the need for a cheap rate, said Nevada Department of Corrections Public Information Officer Brian Connett. (note: there’s a whole lot of conflict-of-interest here).

Danny Thompson, of the AFL-CIO, also protested Alpine Steel’s use of cheap prison labor.

“They’re displacing people who are out of work with prisoners,” he said. “There’s no way you can compete. … I have 300 out-of-work ironworkers who are not criminals.”

He said Alpine Steel produced steel girders for a construction project at the North Fifth Street Bridge in North Las Vegas.

Calling into question the quality of prison labor, he said the potential lack of certification and training for prison laborers could lead to unsafe construction on a public road over Interstate 15.

The company’s owner, Randy Bulloch, testified to legislators that his company did no work on girders for that project and that the prison laborers have required certifications.

Cox also said Alpine Steel is on a payback program and is no longer operating within the state’s prison system, although that could change in the future.

and now for Bob’s comment posted to the Las Vegas Sun’s article:

  1. By bobsloan

March 8, 2013 8:32 p.m. Director Cox seemed to be at a loss for solutions to the many problems surrounding his prison industries – and on how to damper the criticisms aimed at him because of the industry program. Some obvious solutions that could have been suggested to the legislature today never came up in the responses the NDOC Director and his Deputy provided to pertinent questions. They could have suggested ways to stop the industries from losing money, such as enforcing collection of lease payments, owed salaries for staff.

Reevaluate all facility leases private companies enjoy with prison industries and increase them comparable to similar leases in the private sector – you know at the rate all other Nevada businesses pay for manufacturing space. They could have suggested not extending credit (tax dollars) to companies partnering with the prison industries. The decision on reducing lease rates to private companies on publicly owned property or facilities should not be a decision made by a Deputy Director, rather one made by the Board of Prison Commissioners.

Taxpayers rely upon Director Cox to protect their interests. Entering into leases that cost those taxpayers as much as $90,000 per year in potential income does not generate trust – or a lessening in deficits. To use such low cost leases as an “incentive” to encourage companies to bring manufacturing to the prison industries is an expenditure that should be authorized at a higher pay grade. It was disheartening to learn that after owing the state more than $400,000 for four years the company in question was offered an agreement to repay the money over an additional four year+ period without even interest penalties. Director Cox added insult to injury by declaring that if Alpine Steel’s work picked up he would reopen the prison industry to him.

That statement alone left the impression the Director was willing to move forward with a partnership that has already cost the state nearly a half million dollars – and let that company amass more debt as if the NDOC can extend state subsidies in the face of legislative objections or concerns.

Postal Service to Cut Saturday Mail to Trim Costs

The ALEC-led death spiral for the USPS continues.  We wonder what will happen after UPS and FedEX get the USPS privatized and then decide that they are not going to deliver the mail to unprofitable routes.  Who will pick up the  slack?  Who else–WE THE TAXPAYERS!

Hey there USPS Management and Union Leaders:  get out there and fight for your survival!  Instead of death by a thousand cuts, go public with the information we have given you about the ALEC-Koch connections to the privatization efforts. http://www.vltp.net/aleckoch-cabal-pursuing-privatization-postal-service-ups-fedex/ Try out some righteous indignation on the public which is once again being manipulated to generate more profit for ALEC Corporate Members at the expense of the taxpayers – and your jobs.

WHERE ARE YOUR FELLOW MEMBERS OF ORGANIZED LABOR?  IF UNIONS DON’T STAND UP FOR EACH OTHER, ALEC-WRITTEN-LEGISLATION WILL SUCCEED AT ELIMINATING THE UNION MOVEMENT FOREVER.

HEY THERE–AFL-CIO, SEIU, AFSCME, IBEW AND ALL THE REST OF YOU UNIONS!  SUPPORT YOUR FELLOW UNION MEMBERS AND SUPPORT THE TAXPAYERS OF AMERICA.  FIGHT FOR YOUR SURVIVAL!  WHO ELSE IS GOING TO REPRESENT THE RIGHTS OF WORKERS?

Fight to survive or become history.
—The editors of www.vltp.net

WASHINGTON (AP) — Apparently trying an end-run around an unaccommodating Congress, the financially struggling U.S. Postal Service says it will stop delivering mail on Saturdays but continue to disburse packages six days a week.

In an announcement scheduled for later Wednesday, the service is expected to say the Saturday mail cutback would begin in August and could save $2 billion annually.
postmaster General Tom DonahoeFILE – In this Sept. 6, 2011 file photo Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. The U.S. Postal Service will stop delivering mail on Saturdays but continue to deliver packages six days a week under a plan aimed at saving about $2 billion, the financially struggling agency says. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)The move accentuates one of the agency’s strong points — package delivery has increased by 14 percent since 2010, officials say, while the delivery of letters and other mail has declined with the increasing use of email and other Internet services.Under the new plan, mail would be delivered to homes and businesses only from Monday through Friday, but would still be delivered to post office boxes on Saturdays. Post offices now open on Saturdays would remain open on Saturdays.

Over the past several years, the Postal Service has advocated shifting to a five-day delivery schedule for mail and packages — and it repeatedly but unsuccessfully appealed to Congress to approve the move. Though an independent agency, the service gets no tax dollars for its day-to-day operations but is subject to congressional control.

It was not immediately clear how the service could eliminate Saturday mail without congressional approval.

But the agency clearly thinks it has a majority of the American public on its side regarding the change.

Material prepared for the Wednesday press conference by Patrick R. Donahoe, postmaster general and CEO, says Postal Service market research and other research has indicated that nearly 7 in 10 Americans support the switch to five-day delivery as a way for the Postal Service to reduce costs.

“The Postal Service is advancing an important new approach to delivery that reflects the strong growth of our package business and responds to the financial realities resulting from America’s changing mailing habits,” Donahoe said in a statement prepared for the announcement. “We developed this approach by working with our customers to understand their delivery needs and by identifying creative ways to generate significant cost savings.”

But the president of the National Association of Letter Carriers, Fredric Rolando, said the end of Saturday mail delivery is “a disastrous idea that would have a profoundly negative effect on the Postal Service and on millions of customers,” particularly businesses, rural communities, the elderly, the disabled and others who depend on Saturday delivery for commerce and communication.

He said the maneuver by Donahoe to make the change “flouts the will of Congress, as expressed annually over the past 30 years in legislation that mandates six-day delivery.”

There was no immediate comment from lawmakers.

But others agreed the Postal Service had little choice but to try.

“If the Congress of the United States refuses to take action to save the U.S. Postal Service, then the Postal Service will have to take action on its own,” said corporate communications expert James S. O’Rourke, professor of management at the University of Notre Dame.

He said other action will be needed as well, such as shuttering smaller rural post offices and restructuring employee health care and pension costs.

“It’s unclear whether the USPS has the legislative authority to take such actions on its own, but the alternative is the status quo until it is completely cash starved,” O’Rourke said in a statement.

The Postal Service is making the announcement Wednesday, more than six months before the switch, to give residential and business customers time to plan and adjust, the statement said.

“The American public understands the financial challenges of the Postal Service and supports these steps as a responsible and reasonable approach to improving our financial situation,” Donahoe said. “The Postal Service has a responsibility to take the steps necessary to return to long-term financial stability and ensure the continued affordability of the U.S. Mail.”

He said the change would mean a combination of employee reassignment and attrition and is expected to achieve cost savings of approximately $2 billion annually when fully implemented.

The agency in November reported an annual loss of a record $15.9 billion for the last budget year and forecast more red ink in 2013, capping a tumultuous year in which it was forced to default on billions in retiree health benefit prepayments to avert bankruptcy.

The financial losses for the fiscal year ending Sept. 30 were more than triple the $5.1 billion loss in the previous year. Having reached its borrowing limit, the mail agency is operating with little cash on hand.

The agency’s biggest problem — and the majority of the red ink in 2012 — was not due to reduced mail flow but rather to mounting mandatory costs for future retiree health benefits, which made up $11.1 billion of the losses. Without that and other related labor expenses, the mail agency sustained an operating loss of $2.4 billion, lower than the previous year.

The health payments are a requirement imposed by Congress in 2006 that the post office set aside $55 billion in an account to cover future medical costs for retirees. The idea was to put $5.5 billion a year into the account for 10 years. That’s $5.5 billion the post office doesn’t have.

No other government agency is required to make such a payment for future medical benefits. Postal authorities wanted Congress to address the issue last year, but lawmakers finished their session without getting it done. So officials are moving ahead to accelerate their own plan for cost-cutting.

The Postal Service is in the midst of a major restructuring throughout its retail, delivery and mail processing operations. Since 2006, it has cut annual costs by about $15 billion, reduced the size of its career workforce by 193,000 or by 28 percent, and has consolidated more than 200 mail processing locations, officials say.

They say that while the change in the delivery schedule announced Wednesday is one of the actions needed to restore the financial health of the service, they still urgently need lawmakers to act. Officials say they continue to press for legislation that will give them greater flexibility to control costs and make new revenues.

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This was written by PAULINE JELINEK  and posted at the Associated Press.  The original posting can be seen at http://bigstory.ap.org/article/postal-service-cut-saturday-mail-trim-costs

Institutional Investors Continue To Press Companies For Disclosure Of Lobbying

Shareholder resolutions filed with more than 50 companies by  more than 65 institutional and individual investors for 2013

BOSTON, Ma. – Investors today announced the filing of shareholder resolutions at more than 50 corporations as part of a 2013 proxy season initiative asking companies to annually report their federal and state lobbying, including any payments to trade associations used for lobbying as well as support for tax-exempt organizations that write and endorse model legislation.

The resolution filers believe that shareholders need better, more complete disclosure of how companies in which they invest use resources to affect both elections and legislation. The lobbying disclosure initiative is a natural extension of ongoing shareholder efforts for greater corporate political spending transparency and accountability. Specifically, enhanced lobbying disclosure will enable shareholders to better evaluate whether a company’s lobbying expenditures and actions advance the company’s interests and do not present risks to company value.

A recent report by the U.S. SIF Foundation found that disclosure of lobbying and political spending has emerged as the “greatest single concern of shareholders among environmental and social issues,” with more than 100 resolutions being filed annually on the subject in 2011 and 2012. (1)

Reflecting investors’ interest in enhanced disclosure, the S.E.C. announced on Dec. 21, 2012, that it is considering a rule to require public companies to disclose their spending on politics and lobbying.

While the U.S. Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision and the unprecedented amount of political spending in the 2012 elections have attracted a great deal of media attention, company expenditures on federal lobbying far exceed political election contributions by approximately a nine-to-one ratio. A 2011 study by Si2, funded by the IRRC Institute, found that in 2010, S&P 500 companies spent a total of $1.1 billion on political contributions and lobbying, of which $979.3 million was spent on federal lobbying (2).  These figures do not include state level lobbying  expenditures by companies, where there is incomplete disclosure and yearly spending exceeds $1 billion.

Moreover, lobbying by trade associations is indirectly supported by corporate contributions that are substantial and largely unreported. For example the Chamber of Commerce spent more than $500 million on lobbying since 2009, making it the country’s largest lobbying spender. The majority of companies do not disclose the portions of their trade association payments used for lobbying. These payments can create reputational risks for companies. Lobbying disclosure proponents believe companies need to manage these risks by assessing whether their memberships in trade associations accurately represent their corporate interests and policy positions, and that shareholders need to understand their companies’ expenditures for trade association lobbying and the risks they might represent.

The resolutions therefore also ask companies to disclose support for and membership in tax exempt organizations that write and endorse model legislation, which includes the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). ALEC approved model legislation based on Florida’s Stand Your Ground law that gained national attention after the tragic killing of Trayvon Martin. In response to investor and grassroots pressure, 42 companies, including Amgen, Bank of America, Coca-Cola, General Electric, Johnson & Johnson, Kraft, McDonald’s, Pepsi, Walgreens and Yum! Brands, evaluated the risk to their corporate reputations, compared to the benefits, of continuing membership, and made the decision to leave ALEC. (2)

Thomas DiNapoli, comptroller of the state of New York and an active proponent of corporate disclosure of both political spending and lobbying, stated, “As a fiduciary, it’s important that companies in which the New York State Common Retirement Fund invest are open, transparent and demonstrate high standards of governance.” Mr. DiNapoli’s office oversees the $133.8 billion state fund. “Thus we have joined once again in 2013 filing resolutions urging companies to report to their investors about their lobbying priorities, oversight and corporate dollars spent.”

Lee Saunders, president of AFSCME and chair of the AFSCME Employees Pension Plan’s Pension Committee, stated, “These proposals are based on the simple principle that what gets disclosed gets managed. Corporate payments for lobbying are a use of shareholder assets. Disclosure will help ensure these expenditures are in the company and shareholders’ best interest.”

Timothy Smith, director of environmental, social and governance (ESG) shareowner engagement at Walden Asset Management and one of the coordinators of this initiative, stated, “Over the last six years, investors increasingly have urged companies to disclose their spending aimed at influencing elections. This year investors have once again taken a logical next step and asked companies to disclose their direct and indirect lobbying activities. Whether the issue is environmental impact, consumer protection, financial reform or shareholder rights, it is important for investors to understand how company dollars are spent to influence our laws and regulations by lobbying activities. While many companies have modest government affairs budgets, others spend tens of millions of dollars annually on lobbying directly and through trade associations. In addition, many companies work through lobbying organizations like the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) to influence legislation and regulation at the state level. We believe it is timely and appropriate for companies to be much more transparent.”

More than 60 investors joined in filing and co-filing the resolution seeking comprehensive disclosure of corporate lobbying, among them are the AFL-CIO; the AFSCME Employees Pension Plan; Benedictine Sisters of Virginia; Boston Common Asset Management; Christopher Reynolds Foundation; CtW Investment Group; Dignity Health; First Affirmative Financial Network; Green Century Funds; Mercy Investments; Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate; Nathan Cummings; Needmor Fund; New York State Common Retirement Fund; Province of St. Joseph of the Capuchin Order; Responsible Endowments Coalition; Sisters of St. Francis; Trillium Asset Management; UAW Retiree Medical Benefits Trust; Unitarian Universalist Association; United Steelworkers and Walden Asset Management. This unique investor network is organized by the AFSCME Employees Pension Plan and Walden Asset Management, a division of Boston Trust & Investment Management Company.

Specifically, the resolution asks for disclosure of:

1. Company policy and procedures governing lobbying, including that done on our company’s behalf by trade associations.

2. Payments used for lobbying as well as grassroots lobbying communications.

3. Membership in and payments to any tax-exempt organization that writes and endorses model legislation.

4. Decision-making processes and oversight by management and the Board.

 

AMONG companies receiving lobbying disclosure resolutions for 2013 are:

3M (MMM)

Abbott Laboratories (ABT)

Accenture (ACN)

Allergan (AGN)

Alliance One International (AOI)

Alliant Techsystems (ATK)

Allstate (ALL)

Altria Group (MO)

American Electric Power (AEP)

AT&T (T)

Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMY)

Chevron (CVX)

Cigna (CI)

Citigroup -C-

ConocoPhillips (COP)

Corrections Corporation of America (CXW)

CVS Caremark (CVS)

DaVita (DAV)

Devon Energy (DVN)

Dupont (DD)

EBay Inc. (EBAY)

Endo Health Solutions (ENDP)

Entergy (ETR)

Equity Lifestyle Properties (ELS)

ExxonMobil Corporation (XOM)

General Dynamics (GD)

GEO Group (GEO)

Goldman Sachs (GS)

IBM (IBM)

JPMorgan Chase (JPM)

Lockheed Martin (LMT)

Lorillard (LO)

Marathon Oil (MRO)

Norfolk Southern Corporation (NSC)

Northrop Grumman (NOC)

Nucor Corporation (NUE)

Peabody Energy (BTU)

PepsiCo (PEP)

Pfizer (PFE)

Philip Morris (PM)

Reynolds American (RAI)

SLM Corporation (Sallie Mae) (SLM)

Time Warner Cable (TWC)

Union Pacific (UNP)

United Parcel Service (UPS)

United Health Group (UNH)

Universal Corporation (UVV)

Verizon Communications (VZ)

VISA U.S.A. (V)

Walgreen (WAG)

Wells Fargo (WFC)

WellPoint (WLP)

Xcel Energy (XEL)

 

Filers of Lobbying Disclosure Resolutions 


Pension Funds

New York State Common Retirement Fund

 

Labor

AFSCME Employees Pension Plan

AFL-CIO

CTW Investment Group

Service Employees International Union

UAW Retiree Medical Benefits Trust

United Steelworkers

 

Asset Management Companies

Boston Common Asset Management

First Affirmative Financial Network

Green Century Funds

Jantz Morgan

PAX World Fund

Sustainability Group, Loring Wolcott & Coolidge

Trillium Asset Management

Walden Asset Management

Zevin Asset Management

 

Foundations

Brainerd Foundation

Center for Community Change, Washington, DC

Edward W. Hazen Foundation

The Funding Exchange

Haymarket Foundation

Lemmon Foundation

LKMC Aquinas Funds

Max and Anna Levinson Foundation

Merck Family Fund

Nathan Cummings Foundation

Needmor Fund

Oneida Tribe of Indians Trust Fund

Oxfam America

Responsible Endowments Coalition

Christopher Reynolds Foundation

Russell Family Foundation

Swift Family Foundation

Tides Foundation

 

Non-Profit Institutional Investors

Manhattan Country School

 

Religious Filers

Benedictine Sisters of Baltimore

Benedictine Sisters of Virginia

Catholic Health East

Catholic Health Initiatives

Community Church of New York

Congregation of Benedictine Sisters,

Boerne, Texas

Congregation of Divine Providence, San

Antonio, Texas

Congregation of St. Joseph of Carondelet,
St. Paul Province

Congregation of the Sisters of St. Agnes

Congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph of
Brighton

Congregation of the Sisters of the Holy
Cross, Indiana

Convent Academy of the Incarnate Word

Dignity Health

First Parish Unitarian Church, Cambridge, Ma.

Glenmary Home Missioners

Marianist Province of the United States

Mercy Investment Services

Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate

Monasterio Pan Vida

Province of St. Joseph of the Capuchin Order

School Sisters of Notre Dame

Sisters of Charity of St. Elizabeth, New Jersey

Sisters of the Holy Family

Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur, Boston

Sisters of Notre Dame

Sisters of Providence, Mother Joseph

Providence

Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia

Sisters of St. Francis, Academy of Our Lady
of Lourdes, Rochester

Trinity Health

Unitarian Universalist Association

Unitarian Universalist Service Committee

United Church Foundation

 

Individuals

Daniel Altschuler

Gwendolen Noyes

Gun Denhart

Carol Master

____________________________________________________________

ConocoPhillips Lobbying Disclosure

Whereas, we rely on the information provided by our company to evaluate goals and objectives, and therefore have strong interest in full disclosure of our company’s lobbying to assess whether it is in the best interests of shareholders and long-term stockholder value.

Resolved, the shareholders of ConocoPhillips request the Board authorize the preparation of a report, updated annually, disclosing:

1.  Company policy and procedures governing lobbying, both direct and indirect, and grassroots lobbying communications.

2. Payments by ConocoPhillips used for (a) direct or indirect lobbying or (b) grassroots lobbying communications, in each case including the amount of the payment and the recipient.

3. ConocoPhillips’ membership in and payments to any tax-exempt organization that writes and endorses model legislation.

4. Description of the decision making process and oversight by management and the Board for making payments described in section 2 above.

 

For purposes of this proposal, a “grassroots lobbying communication” is a communication directed to the general public that (a) refers to specific legislation or regulation, (b) reflects a view on the legislation or regulation and (c) encourages the recipient of the communication to take action with respect to the legislation or regulation.

“Indirect lobbying” is lobbying engaged in by a trade association or other organization of which ConocoPhillips is a member.

Both “direct and indirect lobbying” and “grassroots lobbying communications” include efforts at the local, state and federal levels.

The report shall be presented to the Audit Committee or other relevant oversight committees of the Board and posted on the company’s website.

 

Supporting Statement

As shareholders, we encourage transparency and accountability in the use of staff time and corporate funds to influence legislation and regulation both directly and indirectly.

This resolution received 25 percent voting support in 2011.

ConocoPhillips sits on the Board of the United States Chamber of Commerce, which is noted as “by far the most muscular business lobby group in Washington” (“Chamber of Secrets,” Economist, April 21, 2012). In 2010 and 2011 the Chamber spent $198 million on lobbying. Yet ConocoPhillips does not disclose its trade association payments nor the portions used for lobbying on its website.

ConocoPhillips spent approximately $40.2 million in 2010 and 2011 on direct federal lobbying activities, according to disclosure reports (Senate Records). These figures may not include grassroots lobbying to directly influence legislation by mobilizing public support or opposition and do not include lobbying expenditures to influence legislation or regulation in states that do not require disclosure.

Also, ConocoPhillips does not disclose its contributions to tax-exempt organizations that write and endorse model legislation, such as a $10,000 contribution to the American Legislative Exchange Council (“ALEC”) annual meeting.

According to the Wall Street Journal (Oct. 26, 2012) the oil industry, including ConocoPhillips, spent “tens of millions of dollars” related to the 2012 election to galvanize employees to support their industry’s agenda and elect sympathetic candidates. We also believe the costs of these programs should also be fully disclosed.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
FOOTNOTES:

(1)  “Report on Sustainable and Responsible Investing Trends in the United States 2012,” US SIF Foundation.

(2).  Heidi Welsh and Robin Young, “Corporate Governance of Political Expenditures: 2011 Benchmark Report on S&P 500 Companies,” Sustainable Investments Institute & IRRC Institute, November 2011 www.irrcinstitute.org)

 

Originally posted at http://www.waldenassetmgmt.com/social/action/Lobbying_PR_212013.pdf
For Release: February 1, 2013

Contact: Timothy Smith, Walden Asset Management, (617) 726-7155,     tsmith@bostontrust.com

Cheryl Kelly, AFSCME, (202) 429-1145, ckelly@afscme.org

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A posthumous legacy of Michigan’s 96th Legislature — some ugly unfinished business the state can expect to see lead the parade of bills introduced in the new session:

Neophyte Republican party hard-liner, Lisa Posthumus-Lyons rode the coat-tails of her daddy, Dick Posthumus, into the Michigan House in 2010. After his failed gubernatorial race and loss to Jennifer Granholm, Dick worked his backroom corporate affiliations, and the father-daughter team surfed their well-greased skids into power positions within the Snyder Administration. The 32 year old freshman lawmaker, Lisa Posthumus-Lyons, fresh out of dabbling in the real estate business, was appointed Chair of the House Education Committee when the previous occupant, Rep. Paul Scott, was recalled.

Upon election, Snyder named the elder Posthumus as his senior advisor and legislative lobbyist. The appointment of Posthumus, a Michigan farmer with extensive legislative experience (having been the longest serving Senate Majority Leader in Michigan’s history) should have been the first clue that the Snyder administration would be nothing like the one painted in the campaign. More →

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Governor Snyder and Republican lawmakers are working on the details of their new Emergency Manager law to replace the one Michigan voters repealed earlier this month. The draft legislation looks and smells just like Public Act 4, but contains a little window-dressing to make it seem less dictator-ish.

Stand Up for Democracy is lobbying vigorously for the governor and legislature to respect the will of the people and not pass another Emergency Manager law during the upcoming lameduck session (starts on Nov. 27th and runs one to three weeks). More →

The Main Street Movement – Struggle in the Heartland

Oklahoma public sector workers and activists speak out on the attacks on workers civil rights by corporations.

Please watch this great video on the VLTPVideoChannel by clicking here