Department of Justice

Lockheed Fires Back at Prison Labor Charge

The defense behemoth claims the government is wrong to say it uses prison labor in the process of making parts for patriot missiles

I previously wrote an article about federal prisoners in the DOJ/BOP Federal Prison Industries/Unicor work program manufacturing components for Patriot missiles (in addition to cable assemblies for the McDonnell Douglas/Boeing (BA) F-15, the General Dynamics/Lockheed Martin F-16, Bell/Textron’s (TXT) Cobra helicopter, as well as electro-optical equipment for the BAE Systems Bradley Fighting Vehicle’s laser rangefinder).

In a nutshell, Unicor (formerly known as Federal Prison Industries), is a company wholly-owned by the US government and run by the Bureau of Prisons, a division of the Department of Justice. (To be clear, this has nothing at all to do with private prisons run by outfits like the Corrections Corporation of America (CXW) or The Geo Group (GEO). This is a United States government program operating in government-run institutions.)

The story was picked up by Wired magazine’s Danger Room, and the tale of the Patriot missile/Unicor connection began making the rounds.

Then, this morning, an email from the Lockheed Martin (LMT) Missiles and Fire Control division arrived in my inbox:
SUBJECT: A Correction Of Your Patriot Story Is Required

Justin:

We have been in contact with the U.S. Army Aviation & Missile Command Lower Tier Project Office, who is responsible for the Patriot missile program, and have received confirmation that absolutely no part or component produced by Unicor is being or has ever been used in the PAC-3 Missile, of which Lockheed Martin is the prime contractor.

The U.S. Army Lower Tier Project Office has made an official, written request of Unicor to remove all references to the PAC-3 Missile from its Web site as soon as possible.

We respectfully request that a correction to your story be made immediately that clearly states that no component or part from Unicor has been or is being used in the production or repair of the PAC-3 Missiles, and that you expunge all references in the story to Lockheed Martin and the PAC-3 Missile.

Clearly, the story as written is completely inaccurate when it comes to Lockheed Martin and the PAC-3 Missile, and the comments made by those you interviewed in your story that specifically mention PAC-3 and Lockheed Martin are also inaccurate as a result of being predicated upon incorrect assumptions.

I am more than happy to discuss this matter should you wish to speak in person.

Craig Vanbebber
Senior Manager – Media Relations
Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control
972-XXX-XXXX (office)
214-XXX-XXXX (cell)

Well, color me confused. If Unicor is printing untruths based on “incorrect assumptions,” then someone has some explaining to do:

unicor 3

Please click here to see the Unicor Electronics Video.  Hear the claims for this government work–right from the horse’s mouth. 
Further, Unicor’s own marketing materials exude a considerable amount of pride in the fact that they have been such an integral part of the PAC-3 program:
unicor guided missile

(Click HERE to access this section of Unicor’s website for their video presentation.)

If you can’t quite make out what it says, or if it is taken down from their web site (we have it on file), here are the relevant sections:

“UNICOR/FPI has successfully implemented surged production to supply electronics and electrical components for Patriot Advanced Capability (PAC-3) missile propulsion, guidance and targeting systems.”

It goes on to explain:

“We assemble and distribute the Intermediate Frequency Processor (IFP) for the PAC-3 seeker. The IFP receives and filters radio-frequency signals that guide the missile toward its target.”

Unicor also proudly points out:

“The Patriot Advanced Control (PAC-3) missile is launched from canisters, many of which have UNICOR/FPI-manufactured cable assemblies linking the ignition and control systems.”

And then, well… there’s this video about Unicor’s Electronics

Oh, and this:

unicor 4

This information is, and has been, publicly available for a number years, hiding in plain sight. Could it possibly be that Lockheed Martin, one of the most advanced and capable defense contractors simply never happened to notice that the DoD, the Army, the Bureau of Prisons, and the Department of Justice had intentionally disseminated completely erroneous information for all to see?

I spoke with Lockheed’s Vanbebber and inquired as to how the multiple US government agencies with a hand in Unicor’s operations could possibly employ such a sloppy vetting process.

“I can’t speculate as to why or how that information got in there,” Vanbebber said. “I just don’t know. You know, when you’re dealing with the government, everything goes through such an extensive approval process, but, well, the information you’ve got is just wrong. I really couldn’t tell you how this happened to slip through the cracks.”

Sounds like the Department of Justice needs to fire its proofreader.

*As of this writing, Unicor has removed any information regarding federal inmates’ role in the PAC-3 missile program

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This article is written by Justin Rohrlich and is published at http://www.minyanville.com/businessmarkets/articles/defense-federal-budget-defense-industrial-base/3/9/2011/id/33261?refresh=1

Minyanville

 

 

Rape of America’s Workers: Crime Victims – Now Prisoners Given Their Jobs

Today Nevada Workers Lose Jobs to Inmates – Next it Could be your Turn

Third and final segment of the series on Nevada’s situation involving unfair competition by use of prisoner labor

by Bob Sloan, Executive Director, VLTP.net

PRIDE logoBJA logoNCIA logo

“Insourcing”..: there is no current definition for this word in our Urban Dictionary or Websters. I plan to change that by defining in detail the concept of insourcing and who is responsible for the practice of it. First we must compare the word to its cousin, Outsourcing.

Society today is familiar the term “Outsourcing.”  When used in connection with manufacturing it means a company sending work outside the business and having it performed utilizing the labor or expertise of others.  Since the mid ‘80’s most realize to American workers, it really meant sending millions of our jobs overseas where foreign labor was cheap and plentiful

Not so well understood is the term “Insourcing” – Insourcing is is widely used in production to reduce costs of taxes, labor and More →

Leahy scuttles his warrantless e-mail surveillance bill

After public criticism of proposal that lets government agencies warrantlessly access Americans’ e-mail, Sen. Patrick Leahy says he will “not support” such an idea at next week’s vote.

Sen. Patrick Leahy has abandoned his controversial proposal that would grant government agencies more surveillance power — including warrantless access to Americans’ e-mail accounts — than they possess under current law.

The Vermont Democrat said today on Twitter that he would “not support such an exception” for warrantless access. The remarks came a few hours after a CNET article was published this morning that disclosed the existence of the measure. More →

Suppressing Votes By Law–Bill Moyers

this post jumps right in to the middle of a conversation regarding voter suppression and Photo ID laws.

KEESHA GASKINS: Again, our research shows us that African American voters, Latino voters, voters over 65, young people 18 to 24 are all in populations that lack this type of ID at rates well beyond the 11 percent of the general population.

BILL MOYERS: You have some startling statistics on your website. Of the states with the highest Hispanic population growth, seven have passed restrictive voting laws. Of the ten states with the highest black turnout, five have passed restrictive voting laws. Of the nine states covered by the Voting Rights Act, six passed restrictive voting laws.

You call it in your report the first rollback in voting rights since the Jim Crow era.

KEESHA GASKINS: Yes, and it is. I mean, when you look at the laws that were passed between 1865 and 1967, the laws that could be ascribed to, sort of, voting and voting rights, depending on how you count, were about 29 laws. In the last 18 months, 23 laws have passed in this country, in comparison between 18 months and that entire period. There has been a concerted effort to limit access to the polls during this period. And this is unprecedented since that time.

BILL MOYERS: Do you think that these efforts to select out certain voters, to discriminate against certain voters that one party or another might not like anything to do with race?

KEESHA GASKINS: It has to do with race because it’s clearly affecting voters of color in this country. The Department of Justice identified that, and pursuant to the Voting Rights Act said the laws in Texas, the laws in South Carolina were unfairly discriminatory. And so, whether or not it was the intention of those legislators to do so, the fact is these laws disproportionately impact voters based on race.

There is so much more to be read in this article, or you can watch the embedded video.  All you have to do is click here

U.K. – Plan for cheap prison work ‘may cost thousands of jobs’

It’s deja vu all over again…

“If prisoners are employed in prison then they need to be paid minimum wages. Prisoners’ families are the silent victims in all of this – when someone goes to prison their whole family goes with them. But wages are only part of the problem.

The real issue is that it’s all about employment in prison rather than employability. Sending prisoners to work in sweatshops might quench the public appetite for justice, but it’s only a short-term fix.

Education and treatment in prison needs to be incentivised as much as employment. The Government rhetoric about work might sound good but it’s just a smokescreen.”

To read about the similarities to what those seeking to privatize prisons are saying in England so you can compare it with what they said and how they lied in America, please click here

Exposé Tracks ALEC-Private Prison Industry Effort to Replace Unionized Workers with Prison Labor

Based on “The Hidden History of ALEC & Prison Labor.” By Mike Elk and Bob Sloan (The Nation, August 1, 2011) which you can read here.

“Many of the toughest sentencing laws responsible for the explosion of the U.S. prison population were drafted by the American Legislative Exchange Council, which helps corporations write model legislation. Now a new exposé reveals ALEC has paved the way for states and corporations to replace unionized workers with prison labor. We speak with Mike Elk, contributing labor reporter at The Nation magazine. He says ALEC and private prison companies “put a mass amount of people in jail, and then they created a situation where they could exploit that.” Elk notes that in 2005 more than 14 million pounds of beef infected with rat feces processed by inmates were not recalled, in order to avoid drawing attention to how many products are made by prison labor.:

This is the most complete interview I have seen to date.  It runs from about 27:00 to 46:17 of the video.  To watch this really interesting interview–and learn a lot about prison privatization and prison labor, please click here.

 

Walmart Scrambles Lobbyists in Response to Mexico Bribery Report

After several years of relative calm, Walmart is once again in Capitol Hill’s cross hairs.

Despite Cummings and Waxman’s interest in an investigation, House Republicans have signaled that they have no interest in probing the matter.

Roll Call reports that Wal-Mart enlisted a cadre of K Streeters to stave off the investigation:

Walmart’s top D.C. lobbyist, Ivan Zapien, convened a meeting of his outside consultants today. Those who attended, according to a source familiar with the session, included Walmart’s former in-house Democratic lobbyist Kimberly Woodard, who now runs her own shop; GOP heavyweight Charlie Black of Prime Policy Group; Paul Brathwaite of the Podesta Group, and Capitol Counsel’s John Raffaelli and former Rep. Jim McCrery (R-La.).

“The allegations that Walmart officials in Mexico may have broken U.S. laws by bribing officials to get their stores built faster raise serious concerns,” Cummings said in a statement. “But I am even more alarmed by reports that top company executives in the U.S. tried to cover up these abuses.

To read this insightful article, please click here.

Wal-Mart Deploys Lobbyist Who Used To Work For Congressman Cummings To Fight Cummings’ Investigation Of Bribery Scandal

By | Apr 25th 2012

This morning, Oversight Committee members Congressman Elijah Cummings and Henry Waxman announced that they will begin a probe of Wal-Mart’s lobbying. In a press release, Cummings announced that he has sent letters to Tom Donohue and Greg Steinhafel, leaders of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the Retail Industry Leaders Association — the two Wal-Mart-funded fronts identified by Jilani as having worked to weaken the FCPA.

To read the rest of Lee Fang’s article, please click here