Michigan’s Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance Plummets

The Robert Woods Johnson Foundation just released their report on State-Level Trends in Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance, and it is no surprise thatĀ the Great Lakes StateĀ is trending in a very bad way.

Michigan has in-arguably been in a depression for a couple of decades — it’s economy destroyed as its manufacturing base dissolved through private-sector downsizing and outsourcing labor overseas. The state’s urban centers and infrastructure are of third-world status. It’s people are little better off.

In the year 2000, a robust 78.1 percent of Michigan workers had employer-based health insurance. That number has slipped more than any other state — now at a low of 62.9 percent. Although still above the national average of 60 percent, the trend line remains very disturbing. In that time, 1.6 million workers lost employer healthcare, and those that maintained coverage saw their premiums more than double from $6,543 annually to $13,803, with the employee share jumping from 14.6 percent to 23 percent. (Find an interactive data map here.)

Next year, an estimated 745,000 Michigan residents will qualify for subsidies to purchase healthcare under the provisions of the Affordable Care Act. Approximately another 500,000 would be eligible for coverage under an expanded Michigan Medicaid Program, but lawmakers have yet to approve the plan.

Here’s the biggest rub — all of this occurred prior to the enactment of Right-to-Work. Under this union-busting law, Michigan can expect to see even less coverage for its workforce. The state will not be able to attract the best and the brightest talent on this trend line.

Amy Kerr Hardin from Democracy Tree